Tight Ends

This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  mtn2top 1 week ago.

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  • #24865

    ag8tor
    Participant

    I thought the reason we recruit so many for the TE position was that it is a central part of Coach Macs offense. Can anyone tell me why we did not throw to the TE the entire game? With the pass rush they were throwing at Franks it seems the hot pass to the TE in the seam was open most of the game. Also the bubble screen to Toney in the flats was never attempted. I know clack management was a big issue again but against this D the short routes seemed tp be open. Your thoughts?

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  • #24866

    Sly Sylvester
    Participant

    Maybe they need to block better first before they get to touch the ball.

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  • #24873

    Arnold Feliciano
    Keymaster

    In his weekly news conference today at UF, coach Jim McElwain answered the tight end question per Sun sports writer Robbie Andreu:
    The Gators have had to use the tight ends in protection. That’s why they have not been targeted in the passing game.

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  • #24874

    Gator92
    Participant

    Still seems like they could be utilized at some point. LSU ran a delayed TE route that worked. Gotta change it up and we were running the ball so well. Never been an OC but would love hear the decision making / rationale real time to see how the play calling becomes so non-creative.

    And, I am not sure why we continue on 4th down to try and throw it to Brandon Powell in the middle of the field. He is the shortest player in the most crowded part of the field. Sorry, just had to get that off my chest.

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  • #24954

    gatorgi70x7
    Participant

    Keeping the T.E.s close to the line of scrimmage, in order to block the ”pass rush” means only 1 thing: the O-line is NOT trustworthy. A chip block from the T.E. on his way out into his pass route, should force a L.B. (or a strong-safety) to cover the T.E., instead of rushing the Q.B.. The Florida 2017 T.E.s are some of the most talented receivers for ”running after the catch” with Lewis & Goolsby. And yet these 2 T.E.’s are RARELY utilized, if ever at all in the games, to date. So that, in of itself, shows us simple football fans (that ARE NOT O.C.s, but still see the ineptness of this Gator ‘O’) that the offensive coaches for U.F. have LITTLE TRUST in their ENTIRE OFFENSIVE PERSONNEL. And sadly, after 2 1/2 years in the Orange & Blue, well, it spells out: C-O-N-F-U-S-E-D and/or an I-N-A-B-L-I-T-Y to call the right plays, at the right time, and to the right players.
    “Timing and personnel is EVERYTHING.”

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  • #24961

    Sly Sylvester
    Participant

    The team gave up 5 sacks on 16 passing attempts. I suspect the TEs weren’t blocking or picking up blitz’ very well. They don’t deserve any targets if they can’t handle their blocking assignments.

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  • #24979

    mtn2top
    Participant

    It’s not so easy to pick up delayed blitzes and stunts on passing downs. TE blocks are critical to effective rushing, especially down and outside. Being a pass catcher is a secondary role that takes a big body out of protection.

    It makes sense right now to use the fast, shifty guys as ball handlers and let the big boys block. Slower TE routes are easier to jump on for the secondary, especially with a young and inexperienced QB. Lets use the size of the O line to establish a better running game and the passing will open up.

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  • #25029

    mtn2top
    Participant

    There you go… we saw more use of the Gator TEs in passing for the Aggie game. What you also saw was how critical the timing of the throw is on short-yardage plays. Not many catches made out of route breaks today.

    Run blocking was not so good in the second half after A&M made halftime adjustments, that’s not all on the TEs.

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