6-Team Playoff

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Gator-6 6 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #27376

    Dr. Pepper21
    Participant

    I posted this as a comment on one of Pat’s articles. Tell me what you guys think:

    4 is ok. 8 is flat out wrong.

    4 is good for right now because it’s the fist start to the playoffs, etc. evne though one conference (or two cough cough) get left out, at least every game matters… However, teams like 2014 TCU and Baylor, 2015 Stanford, 2016 Penn St. and 2017 Ohio St. all were high caliber championship teams that were left out, and some had a case that they were the best team in the nation. Also GO5 teams like Houston, UCF, and, although this was pre-playoff era, 2006 Boise St. all deserve to at least have a chance to compete for the title.

    In an 8 team playoff, a game like UF-FSU simply wouldn’t matter if UF had already clinched the east. Games at the end of seasons where the team has already clinched the division (like November for Georgia) wouldn’t matter either – just win the conf champ game, u in. This style of playoff is ludicrous.

    So what’s the middle ground? Average it out. A 6 team playoff would not only be the solution to both problems, but it’s not unprecedented – in fact, there’s one in this very sport, to determine who will represent the A or NFC in the super bowl. I think it’d be 1.2.3.4. all conference champions, 5. wild card, which CAN be a 5th conference champion but doesn’t have to be, 6. highest ranked GO5 team. Every game would matter because you still aren’t guarenteed a spot if you win your conference, and every single other team would be vying for that wild card – not to mention how valuable a first round bye is.

    So the playoff for this year would be

    1. Clemson, which would play lowest remaining seed in round 2, 2. Oklahoma, which would play highest remaining seed in round 2, 3. Georgia, which would play 6. UCF in round 1, and 4. Ohio St., which would play 5. Alabama in round 1.

    Or last year:

    1. Alabama, which would play lowest remaining seed in round 2, 2. Clemson, which would play highest remaining seed in round 2, 3. Washington, which would play 6. WMU in round 1, and 4. Penn St., which would play 5. Ohio St. in round 1 (Can you imagine the beef around a Penn St. OSU rematch? :D).

    Or the year before:

    1. Clemson, which would play lowest remaining seed in round 2, 2. Alabama, which would play highest remaining seed in round 2, 3. Mich St., which would play 6. Houston in round 1, and 4. Oklahoma., which would play 5. Stanford in round 1.

    Or the inaugural year:

    1. Alabama, which would play lowest remaining seed in round 2, 2. Oregon, which would play highest remaining seed in round 2, 3. FSU, which would play 6. Boise St. in round 1, and 4. Ohio St., which would play 5. TCU/Baylor (Committee’s pick) in round 1.

    This is the midle ground between the two. It will make sure that the best team wins the championship, but not make it so that it’s easy to get into the playoffs, with an 8 team.

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  • #27377

    mtn2top
    Participant

    From my perspective, at this point it’s about eliminating a game or two out of the season and not adding one more at the end. By the time you get to the end of the season you’re beat up and tired. Conference games and championships should mean everything, not a beauty contest of who looks the best at the end.

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  • #27398

    NotQyteNeo
    Participant

    If you add another round might as well go to 8. 6 doesn’t really make any sense,
    5 – P5 champs
    1 – Top Go5 champ
    2 – at large

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  • #27405

    youneverknow
    Participant

    I think 6 is the right number. 8 dilutes the playoffs, 4 is not enough. 6 would cover any legit contender that always seems to be out there every year. The top 2 teams get a bye as a reward, yes just like the NFL system. And there would only be one additional week involved.

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    • #27406

      NotQyteNeo
      Participant

      That’s just ridiculous …

      The NFL only has 32 teams and 12 make the playoffs. And the NFL playoff is extremely popular. The 68 team B-Ball playoff is arguably the most popular of any sport or level in North America. The FCS playoffs is 32 teams, and nothing is remotely diluted. FBS playoff would have to go to 64 teams to even have a shred of a “diluted” argument.

      SMH

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      • #27407

        NotQyteNeo
        Participant

        Correction: FCS playoff is 24 teams.

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      • #27729

        Louis Nerd
        Participant

        6 is unfair. How can you not see this. Lower seeds would have to play an extra game.

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  • #27474

    Black Dahlia
    Participant

    UCF should have been in the 4-team playoff to begin with. They are proving it on the field as I type.

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  • #27527

    youneverknow
    Participant

    Further proof to the argument to expand the playoffs. Now let’s see what effect another all SEC NCG will have on them going for5.

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  • #27767

    Gator-6
    Participant

    Well, you have 5 P-5 conferences to start with. You have 4 independents, and a slew of Go5 teams, some of which are ranked. In addition, you have a bunch of really good P-5 teams everybody apparently feels sorry for because they lost a game or two, and thus it somehow isn’t “fair” to leave them out. Conference champions are automatically in, whether they shouldn’t have beaten the team they beat for the conference title or not (thus I suppose makes it unfair?). Take wildcards from the other identified categories, and just do the damn thing in the existing manor bowls.
    What would be even cooler, although next to impossible, play the NCAA national championship game on Saturday and the NFL super bowl on Sunday, same stadium. No, wait, that would certainly be unfair to somebody, violate sombody’s rights, or otherwise exclude some deserving team who lost a game they should have won. Besides, it would be a logistical nightmare to begin with. And yet, cool, huh?

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