3 Gators to be charged with felony grand theft

This topic contains 16 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  vulcan_alex 1 month ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #24255

    amber7
    Participant

    Three Florida Gators are to be charged with felony grand theft, according to USA today. Antonio Callaway, Jordan Smith, and one other that is unnamed. It is anticipated that six more will be charged. It is possible that charges will be filed by the end of this week.

    1
  • #24256

    gator_tom
    Participant

    WOW – Idiots.

    0
  • #24258

    amber7
    Participant

    The NCAA is either investigating this or will be. These type of allegations and now charges are not going away soon. MAC is obviously recruiting players that have little or no character in their personal lives. With NCAA coming in for the review of this, I am thinking the phrase LACK OF INSTITUTIONAL CONTROL, is something that is going to be bantered around the UF chancellor and President’s e-mails from the NCAA. This many players? Wow, this will get ugly fast. I am even thinking that MAC will be forced to leave by the NCAA, and will also possibly get a several year show-clause put on him!

    -4
  • #24262

    DrG8r
    Participant

    Apparently, Aaron Hernandez was not the person of character that Gator Nation once thought. Percy Harvin allegedly had flaws. The Chris Rainey fiasco also comes to mind and no one was accusing Urban Meyer of losing control. No doubt, success causes us to overlook or rationalize issues differently. With that said, sports analyst’s have also recognized that when college coaches recruit talent, character flaws emerge. I well remember Free Shoes University and the star players who STOLE shoes without ANY REALISTIC repurcussions, and no one was suggesting that Bobby Bowden had lost control of his team. Yes, the charges are more serious than free shoes, but no coach is capable of electronically monitoring his player’s 24/7. Who saw Antonio Calloway’s apparent demise? No, not shocked, but I WELL REMEMBER, during the Spring Game, the announcer’s discussing both Calloway and Scarlet appeared to be walking the straight and narrow. No, I don’t blame a coach for character issues on a team, as character roots stem from upbringing and life choices. I consider materialism, ego, and temptation to be important factors as well. Who do we blame for Ezekiel Eliot’s mistakes! His parents? The Cowboys Organization? How about we blame Ezekiel Eliot or shall we give him a participation trophy instead? I am not anti-McElwain yet. Whether he is able to right the ship remains to be seen.

    2
    • #24277

      gator_tom
      Participant

      Amber1 – you sound hopeful about the situation. Like you want it to happen?

      1
    • #24281

      Home Grown Gator
      Participant

      If anything this upleasant incident proves that Florida has great institutional control. No University can stop a young student athelete from doing something illegal or wrong. All you can do is educate before hand ad drop the hammer when rules or laws are disobeyed. That is exactly what happened on this occassion.
      I do ot see this as an NCAA issue unless you cover the incident up or use inelligble players in a game. It is a darn shame the position these kids put themselves in such a predicament, but they have noooe to blame but themselves not UF

      6
  • #24273

    gator67
    Participant

    If the players had not been suspended very quickly after these allegations came to light, and if coaches or other people associated with the program had aided and abetted this activity, then I would expect the possible charge of lack of institutional control. That phrase does not mean that coaches are expected to control the behavior of players at every moment of their lives — such an expectation would be preposterous. The issue of institutional control has to do with whether the institution is involved in or winks at behavior that violates NCAA rules. It is hard for me to see how there is any hint of that in this situation.

    Those involved in this wrongdoing bear responsibility for it. It remains to be seen how serious the charges will be, and indications are that most of them will likely be charged with misdemeanors; but it is still a sad time for the Florida Gators. Again, I do not blame the coaches since I have seen no evidence that they had any awareness this was going on until shortly before the suspensions. It is hard to see how the NCAA would hold them responsible either.

    2
  • #24274

    gator67
    Participant

    I will add that institutional control includes having mechanisms in place to try to prevent violation of NCAA rules. But those do not guarantee that players won’t engage in wrongdoing. I am confident that the UF has a robust structure for this purpose, but those structures do not follow student-athletes 24/7, nor can anyone expect them to.

    1
  • #24282

    g8tr76
    Participant

    I don’t deal with these kids, and I don’t know all the issues, but I suspect that when you give an 18 year old a credit card problems could occur. I an certain that they were told what they were for by UF staff, so IC should not be an issue. If the things end up to be more than UF credit card, 67 is right, UF can’t follow them 24/7, so IC shouldn’t be a concern there either. I feel badly for these kids, I hope they take the lesson to heart.

    1
  • #24284

    DrG8r
    Participant

    I am a long-time Gator fan and don’t wish to see anything punitive happen to any team member or coach. However, I value fairness, and when someone is out of line, then correction needs to occur. Isn’t that a normal expectation? I was merely making the point that character issues tend to come with talent. I disagree that McElwain doesn’t have control of the team because of these character issues. As I said before, Bowden and Meyer had players with character issues.

    0
  • #24288

    blue
    Participant

    There is no USA Today article.

    -1
  • #24289

    Gators93
    Participant

    If the athletic department didn’t abet them in their crime and didn’t create an environment that facilitated these crimes (knowing about it and turning a blind eye), then there is nothing the NCAA can or will do.

    1
  • #24293

    mtn2top
    Participant

    I’ll wait for the facts.

    What we are seeing is UF being extra careful in how the incident is handled. If I understand the issues, the debit cards don’t have much money on them, and are limited to use at the Hub or other bookstores. There may have been some type of fraud in buying books or supplies for other students in order to get cash.

    UF has been far in front of this, as should be expected. Keeping the players out of competition until the investigation is complete is the right thing to do on every level.

    If the rumors are true, two or three people will face more serious consequences, the rest will be reinstated.

    2
  • #24294

    Sly Sylvester
    Participant

    I am not excusing what these players did but let’s put this “felony” crime into perspective, shall we? The Financial Collapse of 2007-2008 was caused by subprime mortgage lending to folks who had no wherewithal to repay the loans. These loans were pushed by the investment banks knowing full well how risky they were but they turned a blind eye because the scheme made everyone involved very wealthy, in the order of trillions of dollars. They creatively repackaged these very risky loans into safe investments with a AAA rating. They had the perfect scheme to make everyone (borrowers and investors) happy, right? Or so they thought. When the bubble burst, they not only caused the greatest recession since the Great Depression, but the contagion spread all over the world harming millions of innocent people. The U.S. Government spent trillions of dollars to bail out the investors because many of these institutions were “too big to fail”. Oh by the way, these institutions had the gall to use the bail out money to pay out bonuses to their executives and employees. Yet, at the end of the day, not one person involved was ever charged or arrested for a crime, at least not in the United States.

    Compare that to what we have here. We have young adolescents who committed a crime in the order of a few hundred dollars. It has been reported that they have since repaid the amount. Yet, they will still be charged and arrested for a felony because it was over $500? It will be on their record and follow them for the rest of their lives. It is possible that they will be expelled not only from the team, but the school. They have been suspended from the team for an extended duration which no doubt have set their careers and potential earnings back. Where is the outcry over the inequality of the justice system in this country? If the legal outcome (not their standing on the team which is another matter) is other than along the lines of “time served”, I will be outraged. The severity of the punishment needs to fit the crime. I think they have suffered enough being cut off from the team for a significant length of time and they have made their victims whole.

    0
    • #24295

      Sly Sylvester
      Participant

      I would be OK with some plea deal with community service and fine for court fees but not a felony conviction. This does not apply for the stolen credit card and paying rent with it. That could be a more serious offense depending on the details that we know very little about.

      2
      • #24299

        vulcan_alex
        Participant

        The deal is some used others credit card numbers and that felony has several levels. The lowest if I remember correctly is like 300 and can get 5 years. By the end of next week we should all know.

        0

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.