COVER STORY

Bye, bye, baby weight

Health Transformations: Erin Slater


Published: Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.

Pregnancy is often the one time in a woman's life where eating more — and thus gaining more weight — might be encouraged. Depending on a woman's pre-pregnancy weight, of course.

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Erin Slater on a trail in Haile Plantation, where she frequently goes for runs.

Matt Stamey

The average woman should gain between 25 and 35 pounds during pregnancy, according to Dr. Anthony Agrios, president of All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology. (The exact number is based on one's body mass index.)

If the average pregnancy weight gain is 25 pounds, Erin Slater gained double that with each of her two pregnancies — 50 pounds per pregnancy. The first was her son Beau, now 6, followed by Hank, now 4.

“I sat around and didn't do anything. I just ate and sat,” she says.

According to Slater, she hadn't shed much of the “baby weight,” which left her feeling uncomfortable with the way she looked.

Slater, who works full time as a medical technician for the Orthopaedic Institute, isn't alone. Trying to lose weight after pregnancy is a common issue.

“It's becoming more of a problem and it's because of a high fat content diet,” says Agrios, who is also chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology for North Florida Regional Medical Center. “[Pregnant] women should eat 300 calories more than they otherwise would, but the distribution of calories really matters. Women need nutrients, not junk food.”

Instead of sitting around and feeling sorry for herself, Slater became motivated.

“I saw other moms that were in excellent shape after having babies. I thought, if other moms could work, take care of their family and take care of themselves, too, then there was no excuse for me to feel this way,” she says.

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