Letters to the Editor for May 31, 2013


Published: Friday, May 31, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 at 11:11 p.m.

Wrong message

The photo of the front of the local section (Sun, May 26) of a crew of bullies harassing terrified horses is appalling and disturbing. To play a game of force with horses obviously frightened of them is the exact wrong message to send to the youths watching this event.

A real cowboy does not force an unbroken horse to do anything. A real cowboy creates a strong relationship built on trust that will last a lifetime.

Why not showcase a professional horseman demonstrating the proper way to handle a horse so they can take away an understanding of the animal and what it can offer, instead of the wannabes who have no obvious knowledge of horsemanship at all? Having “fun” at the expense of these animals is disgusting and they will never be able to trust a person again, setting them up for failure in an already tough world.

Gloria Bergmann,

Archer

Right idea

Richard Moyer (Sun, May 26) has the right idea as to the transfer of a limited interest in the city's green-space property along Eighth Avenue to Nathan Collier during his life.

It would revert upon his death to the city, or be possibly renewed by his heirs, but its use would be limited to conservation only. Collier could possibly be allowed to put up a fence like the one along Westside Park, but certainly not allow an awful thing like his wood fence.

As to the repaving of Eighth Avenue, if the city really is concerned about the safety of bicycle riders they would never put another bike lane on the same pavement as motor vehicle traffic. I ride my bike irregularly along such areas and always feel like my life is at high risk. If you want a bike lane, put it above the curb away from traffic; pave over some grass.

Bruce Hoffman,

Gainesville

Food monopoly

The Adena Springs Ranch has become the lightning rod for all things water related, but the May 25 worldwide “March Against Monsanto” should alert the environmentally concerned public to the real demons.

The majority of our water actually goes to heavily irrigated, highly polluting, disease-generating, genetically modified organism agriculture. Genetically modified grains/soy feed our processed fake-food giants, ethanol plants and confined animal feedlot operations, while burdening our clueless health care system.

Adena ranch is focused on healthy grass-fed meats.

Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio along with the White House, State Department, the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the Florida departments of environmental protection and agriculture, water management districts, Wall Street and the Farm Bureau seem like they can't get enough of the sinister GMO food monopoly with all its fictitious claims and proven health hazards. Enough already!

Randall Lance,

Wellborn

Preserve all life

The Sixth Commandment is that thou shalt not kill. I presume that means that all life is holy and should be preserved. Clearly, however, we cannot preserve all life and must sometimes make choices. I wonder, however, why unborn lives seem to some to be worth more than the lives of people who are already born.

There is no doubt that the killing of three unborn or just-born infants by the abortion doctor was horrible and criminal, and he deserves all of the punishment that the law can bring to bear. There is, however, great doubt as to why these three deaths and the abortion of thousands of unborn are so notable (compared to the deaths of 20 innocent existing children in Newtown, Conn., and 30,000 deaths per year from gun violence in the U.S.) that state legislatures and Congress needs to act against abortion but not against gun violence.

George L. Barnett,

Micanopy

Early results

Bad news for all those haters about Obamacare. Despite all the attempts by the conservatives to derail it, not expand Medicaid and fail to set up exchanges, early results from states that have implemented it, such as California, show that it does lower rates while covering more people.

In Massachusetts, which was the model for most of Obamacare, it has worked successfully for years.

As long as private insurance companies are in it for profit, rates will climb much to the dismay of the naysayers who think that Obamacare would eliminate any premium increases. But early indications are that these rates will increase at a moderate level. The good news for most of us who already have coverage is there will be very little change.

Just imagine what might happen if the haters would help make improvements to benefit everyone, but they're too busy trying to find dirt on President Obama.

Boyd Rasmussen,

Gainesville

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