Letters to the Editor for May 11, 2013


Published: Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 10:24 p.m.

Rare and unique

The streetcar revolutionized Portland. Whatever Portland did, they did it right. If you do it right in Gainesville, the results will be wonderful for the people.

What would you rather take, a smelly bus or an electric trolley? Buses are everywhere, but trolley cars are rare and unique. It is a question of vision.

Jerry MacDougall,

Alachua

Wasting money

In order to control traffic and lives, do not narrow roadways for bicycles. Widen the sidewalks (little used anyway) and require bicycles to use them.

Do not put in a trolley — They waste energy and money and there are not enough riders. Get smaller buses as there are rarely a large number of riders anywhere.

Stop wasting the taxpayers' money on your dreams!

Everett Scroggie Jr.,

Gainesville

Pothole city

Alas, our lovely “Tree City” is fast becoming known as “Pothole City!”

Mary Young,

Gainesville

Too good

Congratulations to Tim Tebow for being voted Forbes' most influential athlete. The fact that he is considering being paid $75 per game for the Omaha Beef speaks loudly about his character.

He only wanted to play football. But when he did make the “big bucks,” he built hospitals. As we said when he was leading the Gators to new heights, he is almost too good to be true.

Jeanne Rochford,

Gainesville

Patently absurd

The Tebow Kool-Aid has worn off. Teams need a good quarterback, not a born-again Christian nice guy.

To suggest that he could be a tight end is an insult to the NFL's tight ends. Patently absurd. He's done. Let him be a Christian missionary in East Timor!

Murray Rothstein,

Gainesville

Way to go

Way to go, Barry O. When you were elected the Dow was 8,000 and now it's only 15,000. Surely it would be 30,000 if the Republicans had been in charge.

Nath Doughtie,

Gainesville

Out of line

Thank you, University of Florida experts, for your comments about Chechnya (Sun, April 20).

However, to refer to the two men suspected of causing the Boston bombings as alienated, lonely young men is out of line. The two were nothing but wild animals, no matter what their origins may be.

Dave Saltzburg,

Gainesville

Reader comments posted to this article may be published in our print edition. All rights reserved. This copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are encouraged.

▲ Return to Top