Letters to the Editor for April 19, 2013


Published: Friday, April 19, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 at 10:20 p.m.

Dangerous signal

Last week as I drove east on University Avenue, I noticed a flashing yellow left turn arrow at the intersection ahead. I inferred that it simply indicated that very soon I could not make that left turn.

Since a green left hand turn arrow always is accompanied by a red light for cars approaching from the opposite direction, I was unprepared for the fact that when the arrow is flashing yellow, cars heading in the opposite direction have a green light.

I suggest that the flashing yellow is dangerously misleading and could easily result in serious collisions. Therefore, its risks far outweigh its very brief benefit.

Steve Landay,

Gainesville

Tragic statistics

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation health statistics, 20 percent of Florida residents are without health insurance, while the national average is 16 percent. Fourteen percent of Florida's children lack health insurance coverage compared with 10 percent nationally.

Florida ranks 48th in the United States in insurance coverage of adults ages 19 to 64. In Florida, 27 percent of firms with fewer than 50 employees provide health insurance to their employees, versus 35.7 percent across all states.

Against this backdrop, we watch our Legislature in Tallahassee opt out of a federally funded Medicaid expansion that would supply millions of dollars to help mitigate these embarrassing and tragic statistics. Our Republican senators and representatives claim their opposition to Medicaid expansion is due to their fear that federal funding would be discontinued in future years.

Apparently, they do not have such fears regarding campaign contributions from health insurance companies and other special interests. They're always welcome.

Bill Treloar,

Gainesville

Peaceably pray

The Gainesville City Commission's Public Safety Committee (Commissioners Yvonne Hinson-Rawls, Todd Chase and Lauren Poe) was told again last week by Gainesville police and city staff attorneys that no buffer ordinance would be advisable for the abortion clinic on Northwest 10th Avenue based upon past experience in other Florida cities.

It was alleged that a few wild cookies have trespassed and stood at the front door of the facility. I peaceably pray as often as I can for the women who enter the facility and the owner.

I respectfully posit that evidence exists, based upon 65 years of data, that a firm relationship exists between crime and abortion and will present to the same committee a paper on the subject. The committee, especially the intemperate Poe, will then have something solid to chew on.

Tom Cunilio,

Gainesville

Testing granny

I had to laugh out loud at the letter from Jamie Mathis (Sun, April 10) regarding the Plan B pill ruling making the pill available over the counter to females of any age.

According to Mathis, sexually transmitted diseases will increase exponentially, women will still become pregnant and men will be thrilled to have sex with their paramours because they no longer have to purchase condoms. Actually, Mathis is correct about the exponential increase in STDs. They are rampant — in the over 60 age group. STDs have tripled in senior citizens in the past decade.

The STD epidemic is so bad among senior citizens that Medicare is considering providing coverage for STD screenings. That's a test that will be paid for by the taxes I pay from my two jobs, and I'm not in the least upset by that. Making sure granny gets tested for an STD seems pretty important to me.

Rachel Brown,

Gainesville

Possible solution

I would like to offer a possible solution to our country's problems of taxation and gay marriage. Those issues are somewhat connected. If Congress would pass legislation to substitute the Fair Tax for the income tax, there would be no need to consider whether gay marriage should be condoned.

Gay couples desire to have the same rights as married couples. Those rights are primarily based on tax breaks that married couples get. If the Fair Tax were to be the method of raising revenue through taxation, those tax breaks and many other tax breaks would vanish.

The Fair Tax by its very nature does not offer the opportunity to have tax breaks. It, in effect, levels the playing field for all citizens in the matter of taxation.

There would be no need to challenge the Defense of Marriage Act. The Supreme Court would not even be considering the case regarding homosexual marriage.

Frederic Lussky,

Gainesville

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