Letters to the Editor for April 10, 2013


Published: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 2:31 p.m.

Limited supply

My guess is the only reason that the Suwannee River Water Management District continually preaches conservation is because it can not or will not take the necessary steps to provide its Floridians with all the water they want or need — and are willing to purchase.

I know of no private water supply company asking its customers to conserve. That only occurs with municipally owned water supply entities.

In addition to providing all the water needed, it would behoove the Suwannee River district to take the necessary steps to have our North Florida springs flow as they did 100 years ago. My bet is that it will never happen in my lifetime.

By the way, I wonder how many water-use permits have been denied. When you are running out of water, you don't allow additional demands on the limited supply.

Tom Burnett,

Live Oak

Just as married

In response to James Ivey's suggestion that gays who would marry "use some other word" (Sun, April 5), I propose the right of gays to use any word they choose is protected by the First Amendment.

The issue at hand is not about semantics; it's about equal treatment of gay citizens. The word "marry" in all its grammatical forms is woven throughout the statutes, law and tax codes of the federal government, states, counties and cities.

To "use some other word," but still grant the deserved equal treatment to millions of gay citizens, would involve legislation to change each act that contains the word. That is impractical if not impossible.

Give them the word marry. Nobody is harmed by that; the traditionally married will still be just as married.

Richard Shewmaker,

Gainesville

More therapeutic

Contrary to the prohibitionists' anti-medicinal marijuana propaganda, many combat veterans benefit from marijuana use for relief of symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

Arguably marijuana is the least toxic substance known to psychiatry. There's no doubt it's more therapeutic than alcohol or the toxic chemicals with dubious merit promoted by for-profit pharmaceutical companies.

I want to live in peace and as mellow as can be, not drooling from government psychotropics, or in pain or wasting my last moments debating funeral options. (Veterans Affairs allows maintenance pain medicines for veterans in states where medicinal marijuana is legal.)

As Thomas Jefferson wrote, if we let the government decide what foods we eat and what medicines we take, our bodies will soon be in a sorry state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny.

Dan Dewey,

Gainesville

Roundabout rules

A large section of the public is unaware of the rules of the road at roundabouts and this likely is leading to accidents.

The rules are simple: Yield to drivers in the roundabout. Stay in your lane; do not change lanes. Do not stop in the roundabout

As you approach a roundabout, you will see a yellow sign with an advisory speed limit. Slow down as you approach and watch for pedestrians in the crosswalk.

Continue toward the roundabout and look to your left as you near the yield sign and dashed yield line at the entrance to the roundabout. Yield to traffic already in the roundabout.

Many drivers are failing to yield to vehicles already in the roundabout. Other drivers come to a full stop when there is no traffic in the roundabout. Drivers attempt to give way to cars on their right side instead of looking to their left for oncoming traffic.

David O. Prevatt,

Gainesville

Angry about ruling

I was angry after reading the April 6 front-page article, "Local women celebrate pill ruling" for the following reasons.

Women of all ages can purchase the morning-after pill ("Plan B") over-the-counter, without parental knowledge. Men are thrilled! Instead of buying condoms, they gladly purchase Plan B for their hook-ups.

Sexually transmitted diseases will increase exponentially. It will be discovered that Plan B isn't so reliable. Women will still become pregnant.

Early on, Plan B has been used for women of rape or incest. Now, it will be used on an "as needed" form of birth control. No more hassling with those darn doctor visits for a check up before a birth control method is prescribed.

Oh, and can I add another reason: Is this form of birth control going to be paid by health insurance companies and/or taxpayers, too?

Jamie Mathis,

Branford

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