Home & garden show continues on Sunday


People walk through the booths at the 14th Annual Home & Garden Show held at the O'Connell Center, in Gainesville Saturday March 9, 2013. The show which features over one hundred vendors continues Sunday.

Brad McClenny/Staff photographer
Published: Saturday, March 9, 2013 at 5:15 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, March 9, 2013 at 5:15 p.m.

Imagine washing your face or brushing your teeth and looking down into the sparkling prisms of a Swarovski crystal faucet stopper knob.

Facts

If you go

What: The 14th annual North Central Florida Home & Garden Show, featuring services or ideas on landscaping, home renovations, solar energy, roofing, decorating, gardening and more.
When: Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: O'Connell Center, UF campus
Admission is $4 per person and free for ages 16 and younger.
Sunday's seminars:
Noon "Protect and Prepare Your Home from Storm or Hurricane Damage," with David Hilman, Custom Design Renovations LLC
1:30 p.m. "Getting to Green: Tips for Creating a Florida-Friendly Landscape," with Wendy Wilber
3 p.m. "Rain Gardens and Water Conservation: Small Steps that Make a Big Difference," with Jennifer Mitchell

For $650 and a trip to Quality DesignWorks, you can. The Brizo faucet is a show stopper at this weekend's North Central Florida Home & Garden Show, which continues Sunday at the O'Connell Center.

“It's more high-end. It's mostly new-construction buyers that would go for something like this,” said Quality's Heather Nazworth, noting that the firm also has Delta and other more familiar brands.

The 14th annual home show presented by the Builders Association of North Central Florida and The Gainesville Sun is the place to go for services or ideas on landscaping, home renovations, solar energy, roofing, decorating, gardening and everything else domestically-related. Seminars and demonstrations are also held.

While the economy is coming to life after five years of doldrums and new home construction is on the upswing, vendors said the trend is still for people to stay put in their existing homes and to remodel or spruce them up.

Aaron Wilbur, a designer with Cottage Gardens, said the landscape business has been busy with homeowners looking to cut the amount of grass in their yards and and replace it with drought-tolerant plants.

Wilbur said he designed the newly landscaped medians with curvy decorative walls and Florida-friendly plants on Southwest 13th Street from the University of Florida to the double helix Depot Trail overpass — a project that shows the beauty of the plants and the landscaping.

“People want less lawn. There are a lot of lower-maintenance plantings you can do that busy people don't have to worry about. They can come home to nice landscapes and not have to worry about it,” Wilbur said. “The words out of everybody's mouths are drought tolerant and low maintenance. That's what everybody is looking for.”

Almost as eye-catching as the crystal knob was a hanging light in shades of orange and white custom-built by David Strickland of Gainesville Lighting.

It is composed of many pieces of blown glass hooked to a fixture to resemble an upside-down Hydra or group of octopuses.

Elizabeth LeBrie of Lake City couldn't get enough of it.

“I love it,” she said. “I love the colors, I love the shape.”

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