Aim high academically this new year


Published: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Monday, December 31, 2012 at 7:26 p.m.

The new year always brings excitement. It represents a new beginning, a fresh start and new hope for a better year than the one before. To me, this is positive thinking, and everyone should have dreams of a better year than the previous one.

For our students, they, too, must learn the power of positive thinking. According to research, there is so much to gain from positive thinking. From my own experience and from what I have read about the benefits of practicing positive thinking, the process enables us to meet the most diffcult challenges we face in our daily lives.

Overall, people who particiapte in this process have a clearer vision of their lives than those who do not. The mind is inspired and performs better by positive thinking. One must understand that everything that is created begins in the mind. Choices are made, emotions are determined and dreams are fulfilled.

What we say and how we communicate to others will determine the response we receive, which will impact our emotional well-being. Our expressions to others will have either a healing or a harming effect. We must be aware of how we speak and interact with each other. We should demonstrate kindness and respect at all times. The bottom line is if we follow the golden rule, we will be doing our part to have the kind of world in which we desire to live.

Since we know that the brain is the central control of our being, then it would be in our best interest to feed it with good and positive thoughts to carry us throughout the day.

I can remember being told by my parents while I was in school that if my attitude was positive and if I approached my assignments with a positive attitude, my performance in the classroom would improve.

Since my school days, I have found this to be true, and I have tried to apply these principles in everything I do. This is not to say that I do not have negative thoughts at times; however, I am conscious of the fact when it occurs, and then I make attempts to correct my thinking.

The idea that many students may say to themselves, "I cannot do this" or "It's too hard" is a defeating negative though process that one should eliminate from everyday life. So often, we hear children make comments of self-negative judgments without a real effort to improve their skills.

Without getting too clinical in my attempt to encourage more positive thinking, I can truly say from my own experience that I find that negative thinking can be burdensome and very stressful. We all know what stress does to the mind and the body. It is certainly not a friend of a healthy life.

So, in this new year, I would encourage everyone to adopt positive thinking to improve their quality of life. Ask yourself, what would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail? Go for it!

Aim high and don't settle for less by compromising your dreams and goals for your life.

For Alachua County students in this new year, I would hope that you learn to put in your vocabulary, "I can do this."

Be positive about your school work, your relationship with others and your self.

Happy New Year.

Philoron Wright is assistant to the superintendent of community and schools for Alachua County Public Schools.

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