Pharmacy owner did recycling work


Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 1:20 p.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 1:20 p.m.

Boston

The pharmacy linked to the nation's deadly outbreak of meningitis is owned by two brothers-in-law who brought different but complementary skills to the venture: One's a pharmacist, the other a risk-taking businessman who made his mark recycling old computers, fishing rope and mattresses. Now the New England Compounding Center and its practices are under scrutiny as investigators try to determine how a steroid solution supplied by the pharmacy apparently became contaminated with a fungus.

NECC was founded in 1998 by Barry Cadden and Gregory Conigliaro as a compounding pharmacy, a laboratory that custom-mixes solution, creams and other medicines in dosages and forms that often are unavailable from pharmaceutical companies.

Cadden, who is married to Conigliaro's sister, Lisa, had the medical know-how behind NECC, earning a pharmacy degree from the University of Rhode Island. Cadden, 45, backed his belief in compounding with a 2005 donation of between $2,500 and $5,000 to the legal defense fund of the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists.

Conigliaro, 46, is a Tufts University-educated engineer and a member of the Air National Guard, from which he retired as a lieutenant colonel in 2007. He started Conigliaro Industries in 1991.

Cadden has surrendered his pharmacy license and resigned from Ameridose. Neither man responded to requests for comment; a spokesman said they are focused on helping in the meningitis outbreak.

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