Letters to the Editor - Jan. 8, 2011


Published: Friday, January 7, 2011 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, January 7, 2011 at 12:00 a.m.

I will support Gov. Scott providing...

To Gov. Rick Scott: I pledge to vote for you in the next election if you can meet the following two challenges:

First, you promised to streamline the permitting process. But "simplifying regulations" is often code language for "get rid of things people don't like or don't want to pay for."

Government plays an important role in protecting natural resources. If "streamline" means "make it work more efficiently while maintaining a high level of protection" I will support you.

Second: you plan to merge government agencies, such as environmental protection, transportation and community affairs.

If you can do so in such a way that each of their functions are maintained and enhanced while lowering costs, then I can support you.

Too often there is a simplistic zeal to cut taxes, costs and regulations. The question should be; "what kind of quality of life do we want and what government services are needed to uphold and maintain that quality?"

Peter Colverson,

Gainesville

Our home insurance is going sky-high

My wife and I received our house insurance premiums and are in shock at the forced increases our illustrious ex-governor, Charlie Crist, imposed on the people.

Our basic house insurance is $520.00, but by the time the state of Florida finished with it, it was $1,769.

According to The Gainesville Sun there could be another 25 percent increase next year.

To thousands of Floridians this is catastrophic. We are being forced to pay for all the rich who live on the coasts who have claims after every hurricane. These fees should not be imposed on anyone but those who can afford to live on the coast and choose to do so.

If this continues, we will be forced to either sell our house or drop our over-inflated insurance.

We pay and pay and have yet to file a claim. Enough gouging of the working class.

James Bernicky,

Old Town

Then just how much is ‘too little?'

In response to Ben Butler's letter of January 6, ("Just how much is ‘that much'?") I thought it would be an interesting exercise to ask just how little is "too little"?

Is it too little when there are children with too little to eat? Is it too little when teachers have to buy school supplies from their own pockets?

Is it too little when we have homeless families sleeping in the cold? Is it too little when there is no medical care for those in need?

Is it too little when we cannot stop the murder of little children in the battles over drugs? Is it too little when those who are willing to work cannot find a job?

Is it too little when many of our elderly have to live in loneliness and poverty?

In "The Christmas Carol" Charles Dickens names our enemies as Ignorance and Want. I think he was on to something there.

Bob Gwin,

Gainesville

GOP double-talk on taxes and spending

On the first day the Republicans took over in the House, I was very encouraged as they passed a rule that any spending increases must be offset with cuts elsewhere.

"Wow! Maybe they mean business," I thought.

But then they turned right around and allowed tax cuts without any cuts in spending elsewhere. What happens to you or me if we have a reduced income and do not reduce our spending? I think we all know the answer.

William D. Hedges,

Gainesville

Are liberals crazier than conservatives?

A Sound Off comment on Jan. 3 cited a Michael Savage book, "Liberalism is a Mental Disorder," and agreed with it. The question then becomes, which are crazier, liberals or conservatives?

When they took over control of the House of Representatives, Republicans had the U.S. Constitution read in its entirety on the floor. Clearly liberals have a mental disorder or they wouldn't believe realistic compromise is possible with conservatives. What compromises can be made with a group of politicians just now reading the Constitution for the first time?

William Lindsay,

Chiefland

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