Shooting case still 'wide open'

Investigators have not identified a suspect in the fatal shooting.


Boris Ochsenius, the father of slain 16-year-old Sebastian Ochsenius, Thursday, July 1, 2010, stands just feet from where his son was murdered in the kitchen of the family home.

Doug Finger/ The Gainesville Sun
Published: Thursday, July 1, 2010 at 6:36 p.m.
Last Modified: Thursday, July 1, 2010 at 6:36 p.m.

Sebastian Ochsenius' family came to the United States from Chile for a safer life. Now it has become the place where their youngest son was killed, shot in his own home.

Facts

FYI

A viewing will be today from 5 to 8 p.m. at Williams-Thomas Funeral Home West at 823 N.W. 143rd St. Contributions can be made to a reward fund through attorney Gloria Fletcher at 4510 N.W. Sixth Place, Gainesville, FL 32607.

A car wash is planned to raise money and had been scheduled for Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Burger King at Newberry Road and Northwest 62nd Street.

Friends of Sebastian plan to have a candlelight vigil Friday at 9 p.m. at the Buchholz High School football field to honor Sebastian and celebrate his life, according to a post on Facebook. Participants are asked to bring their own candles to the event.

Contact Information

To report information about the case, contact Sheriff's Detective Dale Buffenmyer at 367-4188.

Anyone who provides information on this crime that leads to an arrest and seizure of a firearm is eligible for a $1,000 cash reward through the Alachua County Gun Bounty Program. The gun bounty callers can remain anonymous throughout the process by calling Crime Stoppers at 372-STOP (7867).

"We bring them to this country to be good people, and this country take him away from me," said Boris Ochsenius, the father of the slain 16-year-old. "Look what they did for him. They take away from him, from us."

Boris Ochsenius cried openly, at times breaking down in sobs as he talked about his son, who came to the U.S. when he was 1 year old. The father sat at the kitchen table of his northwest Gainesville home. Just steps away was the spot where he found Sebastian fatally shot Tuesday morning at about 3:45 a.m.

The Buchholz High School student died within minutes in his father's arms.

"I tried to keep him with me," said Boris Ochsenius, 49. "I saw his face. I think he was going in peace. At least I was with him. I grabbed his hand. I grabbed his head. And I hold him against me. I know he was going to die ... He knew he was going to die. That's the reason I hold him the more I can before he leaves.

"He looked at me, and he didn't want to say anything. He died like a man. He was a good man," Ochsenius said before he began crying too hard to continue speaking.

Investigators still are searching for the person who shot and killed Sebastian but have released no new information in the case.

Alachua County sheriff's detectives continued to run down leads Thursday. They said they have no suspects and that the case remained "wide open," with deputies trying to learn why the teenager was attacked, spokesman Art Forgey said.

Officers were looking at all avenues, from speaking with Sebastian's family and friends, to questioning why someone might have entered the house where Sebastian kept his Nissan 350Z and the family runs a home business, deputies said.

Eight detectives and a detective supervisor have been working on the case, the Sheriff's Office said, with officers speaking with the Gainesville Police Department to see if it might have any information that could help solve the crime.

Forgey said earlier in the week that deputies would be patrolling the area on a more regular basis. Sheriff Sadie Darnell also urged residents not to panic but to be smart about securing their homes by locking doors and windows.

Sebastian had stayed up late playing video games with a friend who was spending the night at the home at 4431 N.W. 32nd Ave. His parents were asleep.

Just before 3:45 a.m., Sebastian went to the kitchen. Ochsenius said he heard gunshots while the other teenager reported hearing both the sounds of a struggle and gunfire, the Sheriff's Office has reported. A back sliding glass door apparently had not been locked that night.

Ochsenius said he ran from his bedroom to find his son on the kitchen floor bleeding. As he held his son, he called 911.

"Why wasn't it me?" Ochsenius said while sobbing Thursday.

When Ochsenius closes his eyes, he says he sees that same picture of his son's death again and again.

Ochsenius, who owns American Tuning and Tires off Southwest 13th Street, did not want to talk about the details of the investigation. He asked only that anyone with information come forward.

"Any information we can to catch these people," he said.

The only punishment fit for whoever killed Sebastian is for that person to feel the pain of Ochsenius and his family's loss, he said.

"Even killing him is not going to return (Sebastian)," he said. "If they cut him, that's not going to return my son."

Ochsenius talked proudly and tearfully about his son, who he called "my little one."

"I want people to know he was a bright, bright boy. This country lost one of its best," he said.

Sebastian never missed school, both his father and mother, Teresa, said. He always wanted to go to school early and would do anything he could to get to class, even when he was sick. A trip to Chile this year was postponed, his parents said, because it originally had been scheduled at the start of school and Sebastian said he couldn't do that.

The teenager, slated to start his junior year at Buchholz in August, already was receiving letters from colleges around the country, his family said.

"He wanted to go to law school," his father said.

The teenager had a big heart and often would bring home friends, his father said.

"He believed, you know, in the best in people," Ochsenius said.

Sebastian never missed school, both his father and mother, Teresa, said. He always wanted to go to school early and would do anything he could to get to class, even when he was sick. A trip to Chile this year was postponed, his parents said, because it originally had been scheduled at the start of school and Sebastian said he couldn't do that.

The teenager, slated to start his junior year at Buchholz in August, already was receiving letters from colleges around the country, his family said.

"He wanted to go to law school," his father said.

The teenager had a big heart and often would bring home friends, his father said.

"He believed, you know, in the best in people," Ochsenius said.

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