Jubilus Concert Series celebrates last days before Lent


The St. Augustine Church choir, with director of music Nansi Carrol, foreground, rehearses at the church in Gainesville on Jan. 21.

Caitlin Healy/Correspondent
Published: Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, January 29, 2010 at 11:14 a.m.

Before the somberness of Lent, the 40-day period of fasting before Easter, Gainesville's St. Augustine Church choir will deliver a little extra joy with their Jubilus Concert Series 2010.

Facts

Jubilus Concert Series

What: Pre-Lent series of classical music performances
When and where:


  • Recital with soprano Deborah Sperlich, pianist Soomee Yoon and cellist Steven Thomas performing songs by Strauss, Debussy and others, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, St. Augustine Church, 1738 W. University Ave., Gainesville

  • Recital with bassoonist Javier Rodriguez, clarinetist Jeffrey O'Flynn and harpsichordist Stephen Coxe performing music by Bach, Mozart and others, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, St. Augustine Church

  • St. Augustine Church choirs with soprano Nansi Carroll and bassoonist Javier Rodriguez, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Our Lady of Good Counsel Church, 5950 State Road 16, St. Augustine

  • Jubilus Ensemble performs chamber music, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8, Baughman Center, 982 Radio Road, Gainesville

  • Jubilus Resident Artists perform music by Bach, Debussy, Ravel and Stephen Coxe, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9, St. Augustine Church

  • St. Augustine Church choirs and guest artist Javier Rodriguez perform works from the Renaissance and 20th century, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 12, St. Augustine Church


Cost: Free
Information: www.staugustine-uf.org/Jubilus.asp

The six-concert music series is devoted to religious classical music. In musical terms, a jubilus is the last syllable of the “Alleluia” during song. There will be no “Alleluia” coming from the choir during Lent, according to Nansi Carroll, director of music at the church.

The concerts begin Tuesday and end Feb. 12 at St. Augustine Church, 1738 W. University Ave., Gainesville. All concerts are scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m.

Carroll, who has been a church employee since 1987, said she started the concert series 11 years ago.

“My idea was to look at sacred music sources, like the Gregorian chant, but also African-American spirituals, early American songs and inspiring new compositions,” Carroll said.

Carroll is an accomplished soprano and composer with a doctoral degree from Yale in music arts. She also studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London and Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony's music program for students.

Along with Carroll as a soprano and the church's choir, the concert will feature guest musicians including Thomas Crane, professor of cello at Princeton University, and his wife, Juliette Kang, first violin in the Philadelphia orchestra. The performers also include professors from the University of Florida, including Leslie Odom on oboe, Steve Thomas on cello and Laura Ellis on harpsichord.

“Gainesville is really rich in musicians,” Carroll said. “We've had people from the university who are participating in the orchestra.”

Most of the concerts will be held at St. Augustine Church, but the choir will travel away from the church for a couple of the performances. The concert's performance on Feb. 5 will be held at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church in St. Augustine. On Feb. 8, the group will perform at the University of Florida's Baughman Center, 982 Radio Road, Gainesville.

The final concert will feature the Gainesville debut of Olivier Messiaen's “Quartet for the End of Time,” a musical piece based on the book of Revelation. Carroll said the bulk of the composition was written in a German prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. The piece is performed by violin, cello, clarinet and piano.

Carroll said she believes music is something that can become more than just a small part of a person's religious experience, and she hopes the concert will deliver that feeling to the audience.

“There are so many factors in producing music, but it isn't complete until people listen to it,” Carroll said. “I want people to realize how important they are and for them to leave realizing how important music is to their experience.”

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