William Dixon: Blinded by apathy, ignorance


Published: Monday, January 25, 2010 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, January 22, 2010 at 12:38 a.m.

"In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." (Desiderius Erasmus, Dutch author, philosoper and scholar {1466-1536}

And so it is that most Americans, uninformed and apathetic, are led by those who see but half.

Blindness was not forced upon us by some powerful alien. Nor was it sudden and complete. It was a gradual turning away from the light, a failure to recognize the importance of each citizen's role in determining the nation's path.

Most chose being nurtured, fed and sheltered by the one-eyed men who would rule us and so accepted blindness.

The founders of our nation were visionaries, educated in Greek and Roman history, science, mathematics and politics. They were "all in" committed to independence. They knew that if they failed, they would all be hanged and their families would be subjected to crushing poverty.

There was no unanimous agreement to seek freedom and independence. Most colonists had no interest or preferred serving the British Crown. Many colonists were cowardly and some treasonous. There were efforts to sabotage the Revolutionary War, particularly in the big cities and by many of the wealthy elite. When the outcome appeared in doubt, early supporters abandoned the cause.

Our founders and the resolute minority that supported them fought on and gained freedom for America. They devised a Constitution that would guarantee us life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness so long as the nation existed. They had full vision; they could see to lead.

Belief in "nature's Creator" from whom all rights flowed was deemed necessary by the founders, if the Constitution was to be effective. They believed men not guided by the laws of the Creator could not be trusted to safeguard our lives and individual freedoms.

The founders recognized the lust for power and wealth that drives most politicians. They inserted clauses in the Constitution and subsequently in the Bill of Rights to protect the nation from those very excesses.

They believed that the average American would have neither interest nor wisdom enough to appreciate and protect their new Constitution. They knew that in a simple democracy unenlightened and unsuccessful citizens, the majority, would soon learn to vote themselves wealth from the public treasury.

They believed these citizens would elect politicians who would take private property from those who worked hard and succeeded. Therefore, they specifically avoided democracy, establishing instead a constitutional republic. The founders restricted voting rights to citizens with "interest" in the nation.

Generations of less capable politicians, pandering to an uninformed public, have nearly succeeded in turning our government into a godless, money-wasting, crowd pleasing democracy.

All that stands between us and collectivism, anarchy and ultimately dictatorship is our Constitution and the rule of law. That Constitution is under withering attack in this Congress and in the courts by the elite in our ruling class who believe we need their help to survive and by special interest groups.

Our ruling class regulates what we drive, eat and buy, where we should live, what we say and who we hire. (Think: political correctness, "offensive speech" codes, "diversity" and affirmative action.)

We are nearing one-party government supported by federal and state employees' unions, teachers' unions and the societal segments that depend on government funding.

Americans who reject being nurtured by a government of one-eyed men, reject trading freedoms for the security given domestic animals, must raise their voices now in support of our Constitution. Freedom, once lost, can only be regained at great cost in human lives and suffering.

William Dixon can be reached at Wdixon16@yahoo.com.

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