Stocks continue '08 plunge


Published: Friday, January 18, 2008 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Thursday, January 17, 2008 at 9:10 p.m.

NEW YORK - Wall Street extended its 2008 plunge Thursday, tumbling after a regional Federal Reserve report showed a sharp decline in manufacturing activity and as investors feared that downgrades of key bond insurers could trigger further trouble with souring debt.

The Dow Jones industrial average lost more than 300 points, or nearly 2.5 percent, and skidded to its lowest close since March and its worst three-day percentage decline since October 2002. The Standard & Poor's 500, the index closely watched by market professionals, fell nearly 3 percent Thursday.

Stocks opened higher but quickly gave up their gains after the Philadelphia Federal Reserve said its survey of regional manufacturing activity registered a negative 20.9 from a revised reading of negative 1.6 in December. The reading came in well short of what Wall Street had been expecting and underscored the seriousness of the economic concerns that have gripped both Wall Street and Washington in recent weeks.

Investors fears of a slowing economy again dominated trading.

The Dow, which had been up more than 50 points early in the session, closed down 306.95, or 2.46 percent, at 12,159.21.

The Dow is now off 8.33 percent for the year; there have been just 12 trading days so far in 2008, but the index's frequent triple-digit losses have now forced it to give back its 2007 gains. The Dow had its lowest close since it ended the March 16, 2007, session at 12,110.41.

The broader market indicators also plummeted. The S&P 500 index lost 39.95, or 2.91 percent, closing at 1,333.25, and leaving it with a year-to-date loss of 9.2 percent, while the Nasdaq dropped 47.69, or 1.99 percent, to 2,346.90, giving it a 2008 deficit of 11.51 percent.

Thursday brought the lowest close for the S&P 500 since October 2006 and the worst for the Nasdaq since March of last year, and both indexes have also forfeited all of their 2007 gains.

Reader comments posted to this article may be published in our print edition. All rights reserved. This copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are encouraged.

Comments are currently unavailable on this article

▲ Return to Top