UF kicks off Black History Month


Published: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 at 1:13 a.m.
Black History Month 2007, which kicks off tonight with a celebration in University of Florida's Reitz Union, will bring keynote speaker Martin Luther King III, son of the late Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., to campus on Feb. 7.
The younger King is a community activist and human rights advocate. As president and chief executive of The King Center in Atlanta, he advances his father's nonviolent movement for justice, equality and peace.
King's scheduled speech on Feb. 7 at 8 p.m. in the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts is one of dozens of events planned throughout February for Black History Month.
In the 1980s, King was incarcerated for protesting in South Africa against injustices against Nelson Mandela. He continued to fight injustices in Haiti, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.
King also spoke to the United Nations on the prejudice against people with AIDS, and he was a proactive leader in promoting anti-racial-profiling resolutions.
In 1986, King was elected to political office as an at-large representative of more than 700,000 residents in Fulton County, Ga. His tenure on the board of commissioners was marked by legislation regulating minority business participation in public contracting, ethics legislation, purification of the county's natural water resources and stringent hazardous waste disposal requirements.
Elected the fourth president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the organization his father co-founded in 1957, King has aggressively continued to promote his father's dream of racial equality. He leads the nonprofit coalition force "Realizing the Dream," which is dedicated to ending poverty in the United States.
Co-sponsored by Accent Speakers Bureau, King's appearance is free and open to the public. Doors open at 7:15 p.m.
For more information, call Accent at (352) 392-1665 ext. 306 or the information line at ext. 411 or visit http://www.sg.ufl.edu/accent/.

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