Resolutions more common than you think


Published: Monday, January 1, 2007 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, December 31, 2006 at 12:36 a.m.
New Year's Eve is all about partying for many folks. After that comes New Year's Day and the urge to make a New Year's resolution. In fact, resolutions may be more common than you think.
An online survey by About.com (www.about.com) found that nearly half of all Americans make a New Year's resolution without fail. Of those who make resolutions, about 57 percent said that losing weight is at the top of their list.
The increasing power of the Web is evident in the survey. Of those who make resolutions, 42 percent say the Web will help them achieve their goals. It not only indicates that more and more people are looking to the Internet for all kinds of help, but that the Internet itself is becoming a primary source of information.
If you're making New Year's resolutions, the federal government wants to help. No, that's not a joke. Go to www.firstgov.gov/Citizen/Topics/New_Years_ Resolutions.shtml to see a list of the most popular New Year's resolutions. Click on individual resolutions and you'll go to another government site that will assist you with ideas about how to keep resolutions including how to lose weight, how to pay off debt, how to quit smoking, how to reduce stress and more.
The University of Maryland offers advice about how to make and keep New Year's resolutions at www.umm.edu/features/resolutions_guide.htm. Articles include long-term strategies for permanent weight loss, putting the power of physical activity to work and common sense tips about how to quit smoking.
Ehow is the place that teaches you how to do nearly anything and how to keep New Year's resolutions is one of them. See the instructive article at www. ehow.com/how_12076_keep- new-years.html .
When it comes time to consider resolutions, don't forget the kids. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers possible resolutions for pre-schoolers, kids 5 to 12 and kids 13 and up. You'll find them at www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/jankidstips.htm.
If you're looking for someone to nag you about the resolution you make, check out www.hiaspire.com/newyear. The folks at this Web site say that if you leave them your e-mail address, they will send you a free monthly New Year's resolution reminder for an entire year, along with tips and Internet links to help you achieve your goals.
You can find lots of fun facts and figures about New Year's celebrations and New Years resolutions at www.goalsguy.com/Events/n_facts. Included on this page is a history of New Year's resolutions, how the ancients celebrated New Year's, a list of people who have celebrated New Year's day as their birthday and how to say "Happy New Year" in 25 languages.
New Year's resolutions and the New Year's holiday are major topics on many Web sites. If, for example, you want know what others have had to say about New Years, you can read New Year quotations at www.quotegarden.com/new-year.html.
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Find something online you think others should know about? Or do you have a question? Let Dave Peyton at davepeyton@davepeyton.com.

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