Jesus deals with your issues


The Rev. Annemarie Mingo, who was raised in Mount Olive AME Church, delivers the sermon.

JOSHUA L. HALLEY/Special to the Guardian
Published: Thursday, June 1, 2006 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:25 a.m.
A woman raised in Gainesville returned home and preached to a packed church Sunday morning at Mount Olive African Methodist Episcopal Church, 721 SE 8th St.
The Rev. AnneMarie Mingo, who recently received a master's of divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, N.J., delivered her sermon to a host of family members and friends from as far away as Washington, D.C.
"I'm thankful to be back home in Mount Olive, the church I was raised in," Mingo said, flashing a bright smile to parishioners. "Thank you for your love and support, and more importantly, thank you for coming to the house of the Lord."
Mingo thanked Mount Olive's pastor, the Rev. Hudson Williamson, for giving her the opportunity to preach, then she did just that. She preached.
Her sermon came from Luke 8:42-48, and she urged parishioners to read the whole chapter when they find the time.
The text is about the woman who fell to her knees and touched Jesus so she could be healed from 12 years of hemorrhaging. When Jesus found out who touched him, he said, "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace."
Mingo urged parishioners to be like the woman, to have faith.
"We've all got issues," Mingo said. "That woman had been suffering with an issue of blood for 12 years. Physicians had not been able to heal her, but she heard Jesus was coming."
Mingo told parishioners not to judge people by the way they dress or look.
"You never know who is trying to get to Jesus," she said, as parishioners shouted, "preach, preach on."
"How many of you have been dealing with an issue for 12 years," Mingo said. "She didn't mind telling about her past because it was no longer her past, it was her testimony. She declared that she was healed immediately."
Mingo told parishioners that everyone has issues, whether they be financial, job-related, relationships, or whatever.
"We all have issues," she said. "We can learn to get over our issues by looking at the sister in the Scripture. She didn't let the past block her future. She had to forget about all the times she had been to different physicians and wasn't healed. She knew that her hope was in Jesus Christ."
Mingo told parishioners God will help them get over their issues.
"He waits on you, and he is ready for you," she said. "While you are trying to figure it out, he is working it out."
Mingo is the daughter of G. W. and Cynthia Mingo, and her father said it is very gratifying seeing the success his daughter is having.
"It's highly gratifying and something I think most parents would like," he said. "It just makes you feel real good knowing she is a good role model for the young and old. I've heard her preach several times, and she is getting better and better."
Mingo is the youth minister at St. James AME Church in Newark, N.J. As an ordained clergywoman, she ministers through various areas including preaching, teaching, organizational development and global outreach.
She is the co-founder of "Those Preaching Women Tour," a national tour with some of the nation's most renowned women preachers. Mingo, who worked for eight years as a marketing executive for Proctor and Gamble, graduated with honors from FAMU's business school. She went on to graduate with honors from Rollins College with a master's degree in business administration.
This fall, she will begin her doctoral studies at Emory University in Atlanta in the ethics and society department.
Mount Olive's has an 8 a.m. Worship Service, Church School at 9:30 a.m., followed by the 11 a.m. Worship Service. Prayer meeting and Bible class are at 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m., respectively on Tuesdays. On Wednesdays, there is Youth Ministry at 5:30 p.m., followed by Worship Service at 7 p.m.

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