Governor has been committed to minorities


Published: Thursday, January 19, 2006 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, January 18, 2006 at 11:57 p.m.
The night before his death Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his final speech and informed the audience, as only he could, "That I may not get there with you!" Although he was one of the pioneers and visionaries that worked diligently for a race-blind America, he had an intuition that the mantle of leadership for his cause would be carried on by someone else.
Albeit Gov. Jeb Bush may not have the same clairvoyant abilities of Dr. King; the Governor's term is coming to an end and the next chief executive of Florida will have the responsibility of building upon the foundations laid by Gov. Bush to ensure the future viability of our state. The next governor should pay particularly close attention to Gov. Bush's commitment to equaling the playing field for minority access in education and business.
Under his leadership more minorities are doing business with the state as contractors, the literacy rates for K-12 school children has increased, and more scholars of color are graduating from colleges.
By holding the public school system accountable and not allowing a separate set of standards for minorities, Florida is excelling. We are not at our final destination of excellence but each day under his leadership we are moving toward our benchmark for success.
This year the Legislature will have the final opportunity to meet the governor at his budget request for an increase in need-based aid for minorities enrolled in our university system. Hopefully their actions will send a message to Gov. Bush's successor that Florida is committed to an agenda for a progressive Florida, for which Gov. Jeb Bush has advocated.
Andre T. Hammel, UF law school student, Florida A&M graduate, Gainesville

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