UF sorority throws a party to benefit AIDS charity


Published: Thursday, December 1, 2005 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Thursday, December 1, 2005 at 12:00 a.m.
The women of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority don't throw just any ol' party to raise money for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
Recently, the sorority hosted Afterdark, a dance and food fest - a smorgasbord of pizza, spaghetti, sweet potato french fries and other things - beginning at 1 a.m. to attract students after they left downtown bars and clubs. The event cost $5 a person.
"We had 623 people walk through our doors," said Vicky Goldenberg, overall director of Afterdark. The event raised more than $4,000 through ticket and T-shirt sales. "It is so rewarding to know that we are able to contribute to such a wonderful cause."
The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation provides care and treatment to children with the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS The foundation also helps find new treatments for other serious pediatric illnesses.
Today, the organization joins countless others to mark World AIDS Day with a satellite broadcast of children from Africa and the United States talking about how they live each day with the disease.
At UF, numerous events have been planned to raise awareness about AIDS and HIV for World AIDS Day.
Free condoms and literature will be available from tables set up along the Reitz Union Colonnade.
Students Taking Action Against Racism or STAAR is hosting an open discussion about HIV and safe sex in Turlington Hall, Room 2354 at 7:15 p.m.
And the Omega Psi Phi fraternity plans a panel discussion in the Murphree Hall commons area at 8 p.m. Free HIV testing will be available.
The disease is commonly believed to be transmitted through sexual contact. But Elizabeth Glaser contracted HIV in 1981 through a blood transfusion and unknowingly passed on the infection to her daughter, Ariel, through her breast milk. Glaser also passed it on to her son Jake during her pregnancy.
Glaser and friends Susan DeLaurentis and Susie Zeegen co-founded the non-profit organization with a mission to educate people about the growing problem of pediatric AIDS and to fund future research on the subject.
Glaser, who died in 1994, was an alumna of Alpha Epsilon Phi at the University of Wisconsin. Her foundation is one of the two official philanthropies supported nationally by the sorority.
"Although the foundation is government-funded, we rely heavily on private donations received from partnerships with universities around the country," said Julie Noblick, manager of the University Development Department for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
"Over the past 15 years the foundation has expanded to more than 750 sites in 20 countries, reaching more than a million women each year," Noblick said. "This expansion would not have been possible without the support of the organization of Alpha Epsilon Phi."
World AIDS Day at UF At UF, numerous events have been planned to raise awareness about AIDS and HIV for World AIDS Day.
  • Free condoms and literature will be available from tables set up along the Reitz Union Colonnade.
  • Students Taking Action Against Racism or STAAR is hosting an open discussion about HIV and safe sex in Turlington Hall, Room 2354 at 7:15 p.m.
  • The Omega Psi Phi fraternity plans a panel discussion in the Murphree Hall commons area at 8 p.m.
  • Copy here heregg here At UF, numerous events have been planned to raise awareness about AIDS and HIV for World AIDS Day.
    Free condoms and literature will be available from tables set up along the Reitz Union Colonnade. Students Taking Action Against Racism or STAAR is hosting an open discussion about HIV and safe sex in Turlington Hall, Room 2354 at 7:15 p.m. And the Omega Psi Phi fraternity plans a panel discussion in the Murphree Hall commons area at 8 p.m. Free HIV testing will be available.
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