French mantle clock is from late 1800s


Published: Sunday, January 16, 2005 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, January 16, 2005 at 3:14 a.m.
Q:Enclosed is a photo of a French statue clock I purchased in an antique shop in Massachusetts during the late 1960s.
It is 27 inches tall from the table to the top of the statue. The statue is brass and signed at the base "F. Moreau." The case of the clock is heavy black marble. The porcelain dial is signed. The pendulum movement strikes the hour and half hour on a small bell. It is in good running condition.
Can you tell me when and where it might have been made and its approximate value?
P.K.W., Gainesville

A:You have a nice figured mantel clock, manufactured in France sometime during the last quarter of the 19th century.
In the mid- to late 1800s, numerous sculptors in France produced high-quality bronzes for decorative purposes, often mounted on mantel clocks. There were even more produced in spelter - a mixture of base metals, with a bronze wash to look like the far more expensive bronzes.
There are several listings for F. Moreau; I am not sure which one produced your clock. Potential dollar value if made of bronze is below $2,000, if made of spelter $300 to $600.
A:You have a nice figured mantel clock, manufactured in France sometime during the last quarter of the 19th century.
In the mid- to late 1800s, numerous sculptors in France produced high-quality bronzes for decorative purposes, often mounted on mantel clocks. There were even more produced in spelter - a mixture of base metals, with a bronze wash to look like the far more expensive bronzes.
There are several listings for F. Moreau; I am not sure which one produced your clock. Potential dollar value if made of bronze is below $2,000, if made of spelter $300 to $600.
  • n n Q:Enclosed is a photocopy of a postcard I found in my late mother's things. Could you advise me on its value?
    R.C., Gainesville

    A:Your Graf Zeppelin photo postcard is of interest in two categories, postcards and dirigible collectibles. Photo postcards are headed toward the limelight of postcard collecting, though photo postcards of dirigibles are currently low on the totem pole. Currently it is likely more valuable as a dirigible collector's item, but this could change over time. One way or the other, potential dollar value is $15 to $30.
  • n n Q:I am enclosing a picture of an oil painting by "J Shelley," that is dated 1873 on the back. It is in a beautiful frame. I was wondering if it had any value and, also, where I might have some restorative work done.
    I am also enclosing a picture of an urn or vase. What is it? I have had people ask me if it was a crematory urn. It is about 20 to 24 inches high and very pretty. Does it have any value?
    F.A.D., Gainesville

    A: I was not able to find a listing for J. Shelley. Paintings of roosters and hens are a popular subject matter in the marketplace. It does appear to need a good cleaning. I think it would sell in the $800 to $1,600 range, based on the photograph.
    The lidded vase with a Foo dog knopf was likely made in the Satsuma region of Japan during the late 19th century to early 20th century. Potential dollar value, depending on condition, is $300 to $600.
  • n n Q: While going through my sister's belongings after she passed away, I came across a letter my brother had written, while stationed in Germany during World War II. In it was the first copy of Stars and Stripes, dated July 4, 1944. I do not know who to contact and thought you might help.
    B.M.T.

    A: In the category of World War II memorabilia, I suspect Stars and Stripes is low on the totem pole of collector interest. Try contacting the following war memorabilia auction specialist: Manions Auction House, P.O. Box 12214, Kansas City, KS 66112 or at www.manions.com. Their phone number is (913) 299-6692.
    John Sikorski, an Ocala antiques dealer, has been in the business for more than 20 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, ''Sikorski's Attic,'' on WUFT-FM (89.1 FM). It can be heard each Saturday from 11 a.m. to noon. Send your questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Gainesville Sun, P.O. Box 147147, Gainesville, FL 32614-7147.
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