More planning for hurricanes means more efficiency


Published: Wednesday, December 1, 2004 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 at 10:10 p.m.
I commend city, county and GRU crews for their untiring efforts in cleaning up the debris resulting from the recent hurricanes. We should not overlook thanks to the taxpayers throughout the nation for funding most of the costs of the cleanup.
We have read of the major problems of disposing of the debris and in particular the environmental pollution resulting. It is incumbent on those agencies that have the responsibility to make plans in advance for the most efficient and environmentally safe methods of cleanup and disposal. In the case of the recent hurricanes, there was apparently very little advance planning on how best to handle the problem of the vast amount of debris.
It concerns me greatly to see the vast destruction and loss of beautiful timber. It is then simply chopped into firewood and hauled away to burn and pollute the atmosphere. On my street alone there were enough virgin long leaf pine trees 24-30 inches in diameter and 60-90 feet long destroyed to build a dozen houses.
If plans were made in advance by the governmental agency having jurisdiction, in cooperation with the lumber industry and tree trimming and removal contractors, there should be a way to reduce the costs of the clean-up, enhance the business of a number of enterprises, expedite the clean-up of those property owners suffering the damage, reclaim the usefulness of an otherwise wasted natural resource and greatly reduce the damage to the environment.

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