Al Sharpton joins Democratic presidential field


Rev. Al Sharpton, right, accompanied by election lawyer Stanley Schlein, arrives at the Federal Election Commission in Washington Tuesday where Sharpton filed papers to run for the presidency. Saying that the Democratic Party needs to expand its political base, Sharpton formally filed the papers seeking the party's nomination for the 2004 presidential race.

The Associated Press
Published: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 at 9:57 p.m.
WASHINGTON - Saying the Democratic Party needs to expand its political base, the Rev. Al Sharpton formally filed papers Tuesday seeking the party's nomination for the 2004 presidential race.
The 48-year-old civil rights leader said he was the only candidate who is "anti-war, anti-death penalty, anti-tax cut across the board." Sharpton, who is black, said he would reach out to disaffected voters, including Latinos, blacks and young people.
"The Democratic Party cannot win unless it expands its base, unless it goes out and gets those that have been disaffected," Sharpton said at a news conference after filing the papers at the Federal Election Commission.
Sharpton, who has unsuccessfully run for mayor and the U.S. Senate, has been outspoken on many local and national issues, most notably on police brutality in the highly publicized cases of Amadou Diallo and Abner Louima in New York City, and the U.S. military bombing on the tiny Puerto Rican island of Vieques.
Last week, Sharpton charged that too many presidential candidates are "rich white men" who don't understand the makeup of America or the world community, and that the country is "going in the wrong direction."
Senate Democrats running for president or considering a run include Sens. John Kerry of Massachusetts, John Edwards of North Carolina, and Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut. Rep. Dick Gephardt, of Missouri, also is likely to run. Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean was the first Democrat to declare his candidacy.

Reader comments posted to this article may be published in our print edition. All rights reserved. This copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are encouraged.

Comments are currently unavailable on this article

▲ Return to Top