Longtime High Springs police chief to retire


Published: Saturday, January 18, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, January 17, 2003 at 10:31 p.m.
HIGH SPRINGS - Longtime Police Chief Tom Wolfe has announced he will retire this year, according to City Manager Robert Phillips.
Wolfe, now in his 70s, has been with the department for about 30 years. Word that he might retire has been an on-again, off-again rumor for the past several years.
But at a City Commission meeting earlier this month, Wolfe talked about leaving the department, telling officials he plans to retire as of June 30.
Phillips said work to find a replacement won't get under way until after Wolfe officially files notice of his resignation.
New rumors, however, are already circulating that some officers with other local law enforcement agencies might be interested in the job.
Wolfe did not comment about his announcement Friday.
City records show Wolfe earns $40,710 a year.
City Commissioner Georgan Roberts said Wolfe has brought professionalism to the police department, which now has 10 full-time officers.
When Wolfe started in the 1970s, Roberts said the department included the chief and one full-time officer.
In spite of its growth, the department has kept its small-town image, a fact Roberts credits to Wolfe's tenure.
"He knows the people here, and he can deal with the people here in such a way that they can trust him," Roberts said. "Things don't have to be a big deal for the police department to respond. We've had many people, even visitors, who have been locked out of their cars and they have, of course, come and done that service."
With Wolfe's departure, Roberts agrees discussion about what's next for the department will resurface. Both she and Phillips believe High Springs residents still want their own police department.
"We're always subject to change," she said. "But, you know, sometimes bigger doesn't make better either."

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