Clonaid official gets a witness subpoena


Clonaid vice president Thomas Kaenzig talks about a cloned baby the company claims was born Dec. 26, during a news conference in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Saturday. Kaenzig, who was served with a subpoena Saturday to appear at a hearing in a lawsuit asking the state to appoint a guardian for the child, and to divulge the whereabouts of the baby and the mother, said the parents would not submit to DNA testing unless they were guaranteed the baby, nicknamed "Eve" would not be taken from them.

The Associated Press
Published: Sunday, January 12, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, January 12, 2003 at 1:20 a.m.
FORT LAUDERDALE - A vice president of the company that claims to have cloned the first human baby was served Saturday with a witness subpoena to appear at a hearing in a lawsuit asking the state to appoint a guardian for the child.
Thomas Kaenzig was served with the subpoena before speaking at the Money World 2003 conference in Fort Lauderdale, said Bernard Siegel, the attorney who filed the lawsuit.
The subpoena orders Kaenzig to appear at a Jan. 22 hearing. He also was served with summonses asking Clonaid to divulge the whereabouts of the baby and the mother.
He wouldn't speak about the documents, and Clonaid spokeswoman Nadine Gary also declined to comment.
The group announced Dec. 27 in Hollywood that the cloned baby, nicknamed "Eve," was born the day after Christmas. The company had originally committed to allow DNA tests to prove the birth but said last week the baby's parents will not submit to any testing unless they receive guarantees the child will not be taken from them.
Clonaid has ties to the Raelian religious sect, which believes space aliens created life on Earth. Their revelation was met with intense skepticism, and experts have demanded the DNA tests as proof of the birth.
Siegel's lawsuit asks the state to appoint a guardian for the baby, saying that Clonaid is trying to commercially exploit the child and that she needs specialized medical treatment. Siegel said that if the judge determines the baby is in danger, she should be turned over to state care.
"While (the baby's) whereabouts are unknown, we believe Clonaid knows this information," Siegel said.
At the conference Saturday, Kaenzig said Eve's parents feared losing baby through government or court action.
"They have been waiting many, many years for this baby to be here and they are very happy that the baby is here," he said. "And all of a sudden, somebody comes and wants to take it away from them ... That's why we had to delay the DNA matching process."

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