Cut glass is from Brilliant period


Published: Sunday, January 12, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, January 12, 2003 at 12:18 a.m.
Q: We have enjoyed your column very much and now, I need some help. I have two glass vases that came from a lodge. They are in excellent condition. One is 15 inches high and the other is 13 inches high. What is their background and value?
P.L. A: The photograph of your two glass vases is fairly clear; they appear to be in very good condition and beautiful.
I think they are cut glass, made in America during the late 19th century to early 20th century. Cut glass collectors refer to the era as the Brilliant period, when the United States was producing some of the most ornate, beautifully cut lead crystal in the world.
Take a good close look across the surface of the bases, top and bottom side, for a maker's mark. If no marks are found, assuming they are not damaged, potential dollar value is $300 to $500 each.

A:

The photograph of your two glass vases is fairly clear; they appear to be in very good condition and beautiful.
I think they are cut glass, made in America during the late 19th century to early 20th century. Cut glass collectors refer to the era as the Brilliant period, when the United States was producing some of the most ornate, beautifully cut lead crystal in the world.
Take a good close look across the surface of the bases, top and bottom side, for a maker's mark. If no marks are found, assuming they are not damaged, potential dollar value is $300 to $500 each.
n n nQ: Enclosed are some pictures of a toy cap gun that has been in the family toy chest for a number of years. It is still in good working order.
I tried to find information about it via the computer and found one like it for sale on eBay. It is 5 inches in total length and on the side it says "Federal Kilgore." It has a circle with "No. 1" just above the grip. I am curious as to its age and possible value.
D.R.N. A: One of the primary ingredients relative to collector interest and dollar value for cap guns is name-brand recognition. I do not recognize the name Federal Kilgore on your cap gun and was not able to find any listing. I suspect it is a generic item.
The overall style has a mid-20th century look. Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can. Since you found one like it on eBay, you will be able to see what it sells for and could contact the seller to see if they knew anything specific about the one they are selling. Q: This is in regards to a Longfellow desk. The desk measures 42 1/2 inches high and 37 wide. The manufacturer is "Colonial Mfg. Co." The mahogany desk was purchased originally in Cleveland.
The card in one of the interior drawers says that it is a copy of Longfellow's desk, and that the original is in the Ford museum. The lady I purchased it from said she bought it in the early 1900s.
I would like to sell it. It has an inlay like a tree of life on the front and a wonderful interior with hidden drawers. Please advise.
H.R. A: It is said that between 1895 and 1914 close to 13 million immigrants entered the United States, causing fears in the general public that the traditional character of American society was being undermined. This helped fuel a sentimental desire to return to America's good old days of Colonial times. Furniture manufacturers capitalized on this sentiment by manufacturing what they called Colonial Revival furniture.
The basic style of your slant-front desk is taken from English Georgian furniture of the late 18th century. The label on your desk stating "Solid Mahogany" and the name "Colonial Mfg. Co." is of the era 1895 to 1914. There are several listings for furniture companies named Colonial. I think your desk was manufactured in either Zeeland or Grand Rapids, Mich.
I suggest before you sell the desk you get in touch with the Henry Ford Museum and see if you might be able to obtain photographs of the original Longfellow desk of which yours is a reproduction. Potential dollar value is in the $1000 range, perhaps more on a good day.
John Sikorski, an Ocala antiques dealer, has been in the business for 20 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, "Sikorski's Attic," on WUFT-FM (89.1 FM). It can be heard each Saturday from 11 a.m. to noon. Send your questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Gainesville Sun, P.O. Box 147147, Gainesville, FL 32614-7147.

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