Northeast digging out after latest storm buries region


Published: Sunday, January 5, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, January 5, 2003 at 1:13 a.m.
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Charlie O'Connor, Wilson Ho and Will McClements, from left, run around the snow-covered Minuteman statue on the Lexington, Mass., Common, Saturday.

(AP Photo/Neal Hamberg)
ALBANY, N.Y. - Snowplow crews and residents across the Northeast shoveled out driveways and sidewalks Saturday after the region's latest storm buried some areas in up to 2 feet of snow.
"It's too hard. I don't like all the cleaning up," Raza Khan, 38, said as he salted his driveway suburban Green Island, where more than 1 feet fell.
At least four deaths were blamed on the storm.
The second nor'easter of the season dumped 12 to 24 inches on the Albany area and the Catskills region, the Berkshires in western Massachusetts and southern Vermont, the National Weather Service said. Parts of Connecticut, New Hampshire and Maine got up to 20 inches.
A Christmas Day storm blanketed rural upstate New York in up to 3 feet of snow.
"These are two blockbuster storms within about a week. I've lived here all my life and I can't remember anything like this. This is atypical," said meteorologist Thomas Wasula in Albany.
Utility crews were still at work Saturday restoring power to tens of thousands of customers blacked out by the wind, snow and ice.
Many cities were still struggling to clear streets.
"It's basically been nonstop. We'll plow a little and rest a little to get coffee and plow some more," said Bill Knapp, 51, who cleared eight gas stations several times over in Albany and nearby Schenectady.
Airports serving Hartford, Conn., and Albany canceled about 10 flights each Friday.
Two people were killed in separate traffic accidents in Connecticut, and New Jersey police said a man was killed jumping off an elevated highway to avoid an out-of-control truck.
A New York man died when his snowmobile hit tree limbs downed by the storm, State Police said.

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