Ventura says 'bye to media


Published: Saturday, January 4, 2003 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, January 4, 2003 at 1:41 a.m.
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Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura responds to a question during an interview with the Associated Press in his office at the Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 17, 2002. In four stormy years as Minnesota's governor, the flamboyant former pro wrestler mixed serious-minded attempts at reform with often outrageous star turns as author, sports analyst, cameo actor and talk show guest. Ventura annouced in June he wouldn't seek a second term, and will be replaced by Tim Pawlenty on Jan. 6.

(AP Photo/Ann Heisnefelt)
ST. PAUL - Gov. Jesse Ventura's final tangle with the Minnesota media ended with a veiled threat that his next pursuit will bring vindication.
"As of Monday, you will fear me," he warned reporters during his final news conference as Minnesota governor.
Six months after announcing he would leave after one term, Ventura refused to say what he will do after handing the office over to Republican Tim Pawlenty next week. The former professional wrestler and actor is rumored to be considering a national talk show.
The parting shot was characteristic of his stormy relationship with the reporters he branded jackals long ago. Over the last four years, he accused the media of focusing on the sensational aspects of his life rather than covering him as a traditional head of state.
It's time that somebody "shines the mirror back on you guys," Ventura said at a news conference called to appoint two judges.
Ventura had little planned for his last full work day; the news conference and an afternoon radio interview were his only public events. A more festive but invitation-only send-off is planned for tonight at a Minneapolis hotel.
The theme of that tribute is "Now, I Got Time to Bleed," a twist on his signature line in the movie "Predator" and the title of his autobiography "I Ain't Got Time to Bleed."
At the bottom of the invitation is a disclaimer that reads "no cameras - no autographs - no media jackals!"
Proceeds from the $100-per-person admission fee will go to a scholarship fund at Minneapolis Roosevelt High School, which Ventura attended, and to a foundation he set up in his daughter's name to help children with physical, emotional and mental problems.

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