Daily Football Fix: An opposing coach’s take on Florida

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(Brad McClenny/Staff Photographer)

Each year, as part of its college football preview, Athlon magazine gets SEC coaches to talk anonymously about teams they will face during the 2018 season.

Here’s what an opposing coach had to say about Florida:

“Tennessee and Florida have some of the same problems. They have some good players, but they have made some mistakes — not so much from a talent perspective but from a character perspective. Player development is something they didn’t do a great job of either. But Florida doesn’t lack for talent, that’s for sure.

“I think Dan Mullen is a really good offensive coach. He was a smart recruiter at Mississippi State. He had a plan for his guys, and he put them in positions to succeed. He did a good job with the offense, developing a spread, quarterback-run offense that played to the strengths of their personnel.”

“(Defensive coordinator) Todd Grantham is really good. Mississippi State was outstanding on defense last year. They weren’t on the field for 70 or 80 plays a game, which showed that Coach Mullen wasn’t just an offensive coach trying to put up yards and points. He had a plan how to manage and win games. And that really helped them on defense.

“I don’t know if Feleipe Franks is exactly what Dan Mullen wants at the quarterback position at Florida, but I think Franks is a pretty talented dude. Big, athletic guy who can make plays with his feet and his arm. He needs to continue to develop the finer points of being an upper-level quarterback. But I’m sure Dan will do a good job with him.

“They need to identify some playmakers, but Dan will get that offense going. They will score some points.”

 

7 COMMENTS

  1. Could speculate who the anonymous coach is. Called him Dan. I agree though are misses have been on character not talent. To have the whole team you have to have people with a moral compass. Some of our guys compass is going in circles.

  2. Florida has always had character problems with football players throughout the years….it’s just always been who has been in charge of keeping those character problems in check while they were here. As we have seen, Urban Meyer had quite a few talented players with major character flaws as did Spurrier, but usually it wasn’t until after they left the friendly confines of UF that those major character flaws really came out to bite those players. MacElwain either couldn’t or just didn’t want to control those character issue players, which as we found out, ended up appearing while they were at UF, which ended up biting the football program. The coach is the standard setter at the program, and if that coach isn’t strong enough to control it, then as the phrase goes, the inmates will end up running the asylum. Dan Mullen was here with some of those bad character players, and I believe had a large impact on keeping them in check, because after he left for Miss. St., more issues began to appear within the program, which I also believe is one reason Meyer ended up leaving for the safer home of Ohio.

  3. The opposing coach’s assessment of our recent teams and Mullen are telling. We’ve had enough talented athletes that McElwain’s Gators were able to pull several some rabbits out of the hat with close wins. It worked to the tune of those two SEC Championship game appearances, where the lack of underlying player development and mediocre offensive play calling and quality were easily exposed. We’ve witnessed a far better level of coaching from Dan Mullen, lifting a perennial milktoast program to a consistently solid competitive level. The Gator team Mullen’s taken over will benefit right away from his initial recruiting and especially via his handful of transfers. And it’s a team with at least a bit more talent than was apparent with a lower quality head coach and staff than Mullen and his proven assistants. For those reasons and more nine to ten wins seem well within reach with an offense tgst should average better than 30 ppg and a defense rebounding under Todd Grantham’s direction.